Mars – NeurosciBioRev – Comparing brains by matching connectivity profiles

The great promise of comparative neuroscience is to understand why brains differ by investigating the relations between variations in the organization of different brains, their evolutionary history, and their current ecological niche. For this approach to be successful, the organization of different brains needs to be quantifiable. Here, we present an approach to formally comparing […]

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Mars – BrainStrucFunc – The extreme capsule fiber complex in humans and macaque monkeys: a comparative diffusion MRI tractography study

We compared the course and cortical projec- tions of white matter fibers passing through the extreme capsule in humans and macaques. Previous comparisons of this tract have suggested a uniquely human posterior pro- jection, but these studies have always employed different techniques in the different species. Here we used the same technique, diffusion MRI, in […]

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Mars – FrontNeurosci – Primate comparative neuroscience using magnetic resonance imaging: promises and challenges

Primate comparative anatomy is an established field that has made rich and substantial contributions to neuroscience. However, the labor-intensive techniques employed mean that most comparisons are often based on a small number of species, which limits the conclusions that can be drawn. In this review we explore how new developments in magnetic resonance imaging have […]

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comparative neuroanatomy

The evolutionary emergence of our human ability to quickly infer upon conceptual relationships likely relies on the relative re-organization of large-scale connections in the human brain compared to those in other primates since our last common ancestor.

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Mars – FrontHumNeuro – Book review: Foraging with a prefrontal cortex makes all the difference

Passingham and Wise (2012) set out to understand the organization and func- tion of the primate PFC by combining evolutionary and ecological perspectives. Large parts of PFC, and specifically those with a granular cortical layer, are a pri- mate invention. The authors argue that the development of these areas reflects the changes in foraging niches […]

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